Timely newsletters arrive twice a week, plus we’ll send special editions as news may warrant.

  • Coast Watch brings a deep dive each Wednesday into timely environmental stories and research affecting Coastal Georgia.
  • Sunday Reads gives a roundup of in-depth news, shared ideas that present thoughtful solutions to our regional problems and other stories for your weekend reading.


Recent newsletters

A Legacy Honored, A County Fights Its Citizens

Sunday Reads – Jan. 16, 2022 We have a lot today, and it’s a good, long weekend to read. It’s a 3-day weekend with Monday set aside to honor the work and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Savannah Mayor Van Johnson hopes you’ll use that extra time for good and is encouraging everyone to fill that time with community service, even on the smallest scale. He’s officially proclaimed Monday Savannah’s Day of Service and Kindness with its very own…

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Looking to court, to lawmakers and looking up

Jan. 12, 2022 The Georgia Bulldogs won, maybe you heard, so now the General Assembly can get going in earnest. We’ll be on the lookout for green bills, as outlined below where we also share below some ways to track environmental legislation. We’re also following the fate of Spaceport Camden, which now has a license to operate, but doesn’t own the land for the planned facility. Who knew the road to space was full of so many twists and turns? Spaceport…

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Gambling, Mental Health, Guns

Sunday Reads – Jan. 9, 2022 We thought the new year and some vaccine boosters might cut our Covid fears, but that’s been a tough sell. It doesn’t help that the state department that is supposed to track cases isn’t reporting this week and may have been undercounting. It’s been an odd week in other ways as we’ve watched our state representatives jockey for positions on clearly conflicting issues before they start their 40-day gathering Monday, and Friday we experienced an…

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Vogtle recap, more baby whales and Spaceport delay

Jan. 5, 2022 It’s a new year, but plenty of Coastal Georgia environmental issues came right along into 2022 with us. Plant Vogtle is still under construction and ripe for a rehash of its history, which Georgia Conservation Voters have provided. Spaceport Camden has a license but can’t purchase its property yet. And right whales keep birthing their babies, offering a reason for optimism about this otherwise beleaguered species. Never-ending nuclear saga The construction of Plant Vogtle’s reactors number 3 and…

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New Year, Old Foes & Friends

Sunday Reads – Jan. 2, 2022 Welcome to the new year — if it seems a lot like the old one, let’s all agree now to work together to change that. In the meantime, here are a few things from the past week to get you caught up. Covid marches on The Omicron variant turned out to be the Thanksgiving turkey that just won’t leave. While its effects may seem milder for some, hospital and health care workers across the state…

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Spaceport, green jobs, hogs and whales

Dec. 22, 2021 The end of the year is a busy time for everyone. This year on the Georgia coast it’s not just busy with holidays, but also with a flurry of activity around Spaceport Camden. Farther inland there’s been a growth spurt in green industries coming to Georgia. Animals have been busy, too. On the coastal list of naughty and nice creatures we have feral hogs tearing up marshland and North Atlantic right whales birthing a surprising number of calves…

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Spaceport Deadlines, GOP Subdivision

Sunday Reads – Dec. 19, 2021 Things that divide. Things that conquer. We have them all: Spaceport Camden, how we teach children about tough topics and facing our world, when partisan political cells divide, understanding misinformation and how to smother it. Spaceport drama adds a new chapter This week, a grassroots effort to stop Camden County from buying land for its Spaceport Camden site ended up in court. A group submitted signatures representing 10% of the county’s citizens on a petition…

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Recycling plastic waste, a ‘Dirty Dozen’ and baby whales

Dec. 15, 2021 You gotta love when people make tough issues accessible. That goes double for environmental problems, where the urge to shrug and look away can be strong. We have found a couple examples of people facing coastal environmental problems head on and with optimism. The first is a Tybee Island resident who turns plastic trash into cheery flower pots. Then there’s a coalition of water advocates who just released their annual list of big issues to be tackled, which…

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Education Economics, Personal Finance

Sunday Reads – Dec. 12, 2021 This weekend several thousand college students graduated in winter ceremonies throughout Coastal Georgia. While they’ll take away advanced degrees, new skills and lifelong friends, more than half will also be carrying about $40,000 in debt into their new lives. Graduation days, student economics and the ongoing debate over tenure for professors bring a focus on higher education this week and the expectations citizens may have for the public systems. And, we throw in a little…

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Entangled whale, bloated nuclear plant, and a spaceport in question

Dec. 8, 2021 Some problems resolve slowly, if at all. Three of these persistent local issues popped onto our radar yet again this week: the plight of highly endangered North Atlantic right whales, the ever-bloating costs for new nuclear reactors at Plant Vogtle and finally, the continued efforts to derail the proposed Spaceport Camden. Take a look at what’s happening and what some dedicated coastal residents are doing to seek solutions. A sad whale tale Poignant photos and video taken by…

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Variants Among Us

Sunday Reads – Dec. 5, 2021 As much as we try, Covid variants and partisan politics will affect our daily lives for a very long time. So there’s no getting away from them this week as we nip at variants of all kinds in health and politics and Christmas shopping. And then there is great optimism from a story about how neighbors can rise to meet challenges and work for a better community for their children. Omicron isn’t a stranger any…

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